Tracking the coronavirus

Stay informed with the latest COVID-19 data.

While the numbers can tell you a lot about the coronavirus, the case numbers only tell part of the story.

Changes in how provinces and territories record and report results can result in sudden jumps in cases. Different rates in testing and changes to who is being tested can also cause a sudden increase.

Cases and deaths in the map below are updated throughout the day.

Canada
Total confirmed cases
Global
Total confirmed cases

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Canada by region

Province/Territory Cases Deaths

Data for daily cases and deaths and cumulative cases and deaths charts below comes from the Public Health Agency of Canada. The charts are updated daily at 7:30 p.m. ET/4:30 p.m. PT.

Daily new cases

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CANADA
AB
BC
MB
NB
NL
NS
ON
PE
QC
SK
NT
NU
YT

Daily numbers give a sense of whether the number of new infections is growing and how quickly. When experts talk about using physical distancing to "flatten the curve" and keep the strain on the health-care system manageable, this is the curve they’re talking about.

However, there are a few days between each of the following: infection, the onset of symptoms, testing, and test results, meaning that the numbers typically reflect new infections a couple of weeks earlier.

A sudden jump in numbers may reflect a change in how data is being reported. For example, in Ontario there was a spike in cases on Oct. 13, resulting from the inclusion of cases that hadn't been reported on Oct. 12. In B.C., data is not available over the weekend, resulting in a spike on Mondays when cases from the weekend are reported. Jumps can also occur when changes are made to who's allowed to be tested and how many people are tested.

Daily deaths

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CANADA
AB
BC
MB
NB
NL
NS
ON
PE
QC
SK
NT
NU
YT

Cumulative cases

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CANADA
AB
BC
MB
NB
NL
NS
ON
PE
QC
SK
NT
NU
YT

Cumulative numbers show the total number of people that have tested positive for COVID-19 and give a sense of how far the epidemic has progressed. The chart excludes people who are infected but have not been tested and those who are still awaiting test results, which can take days. That means the actual number of infections may be much larger.

The chart does include people who have recovered and are no longer infected. Here, too, sudden changes may reflect a change in the amount of testing or reporting rather than a change in the actual number of cases.

Cumulative deaths

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CANADA
AB
BC
MB
NB
NL
NS
ON
PE
QC
SK
NT
NU
YT

Because the number of reported cases depends on how much testing is done and how targeted or widespread it is, epidemiologists consider deaths to be a better gauge of the actual number of infections and the progress of the epidemic. While it takes a couple of weeks for an infected person to be reported as a positive case, death occurs, on average, more than three weeks after a person has been infected.

That means while deaths represent information that may be more accurate and precise, the figures are also more out of date than reported cases.

Regional testing rates

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Type of regional COVID testing data

The number of nasal swab tests conducted in a province determines the number of novel coronavirus infections that can be detected. Per capita testing takes into account the population. It gives an idea of the relative proportion of cases in the province being detected: low per capita testing may mean a higher number of undetected cases.

However, provinces have different criteria for who can get tested. More targeted criteria may detect a greater number of cases with fewer tests.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases worldwide

Country Cases Deaths